Kista plays catch-up… again!

September 22, 2015

shoosewisely_0So, efforts to target the enterprise IT buyer by the mobile infrastructure industry received another strong validation last week. If you recall, SpiderCloud’s strategic collaboration with Cisco to deliver compelling offerings to enterprise customers was unveiled at MWC15. Well, it looks like Ericsson has finally realized that their “carrier-grade Wi-Fi” is not good enough for enterprise, and HP has realized that they cannot turn a blind-eye to licensed spectrum. So, here they are with a new press release.

17 Sep 2015 – Ericsson Press Release

Highlights:

  • Bilateral reseller agreement opens up enterprise market opportunities beyond Ericsson’s carrier-grade Wi-Fi and provides go-to-market opportunities for Ericsson’s industry-leading small cells through HP’s global enterprise channels
  • Leverages HP’s acquisition of Aruba Networks through integration of HP’s enterprise WLAN technology into Ericsson RBS 6402 picocell

There are a number of apparent gaps in the technology collaboration that appear problematic and make us ask questions, such as:

  • It only covers the RBS 6402, which is a picocell product targeted at the SMB market (up to 5,000 m2 building). The medium-large building “Radio Dot” platform is visibly missing from the announcement. Is HP-Aruba Wi-Fi in-scope for the Dot, or does a parallel infrastructure need to be put in place?
  • Where is support for enterprises who have HP-Aruba systems in-place now? We don’t see it. By contrast, current generation Cisco AP’s sport a modular port where our jointly developed cellular Clip-On module can be simply plugged into them. This provides for an implementation that leverages the pre-existing enterprise transport infrastructure, to quickly bring critical mobile service to the Cisco enabled buildings.
  • What are the RF deployment tradeoffs for implementation to stay within the standards based PoE+ power budget? From a product perspective, will there be multiple versions of the RBS 6402 that include the different mixes of 3G, LTE and Wi-Fi radios, or only one version? And, how many radios can be active?

What’s our take on the commercial effects?

The reseller agreement validates that mobile wireless infrastructure vendors have to find a way to offer their products directly to Enterprise. We have seen this trend emerging over the last three years as mobile has become business critical, and energy efficient (metal coated) window glass rollouts are accelerating.

While this transition was started with the emergence of scalable small cells that are “IT friendly” and achieve a Wi-Fi price point, the completion of transition will be stable, operator models that facilitate “frictionless adoption” by enterprises. This change in thinking is at the vanguard of many operators whose customers are demanding better service. We documented some of the building blocks to the future in our post Enterprise Small Cell Deployment Insights as a start point for commercialization thinking about the transition.

Finally, the technology exchange involved in the agreement is not clear on the roles of each of the Wi-Fi divisions. The need to seek an external source for 802.11ac technology for the RBS 6402 raises red flags. On the RBS 6402, there are additional new questions beyond our Small Cell “Super Bass-O-Matic’76”? post that unpacked the technology realities of the first RBS announcement.

As always, nothing is simple when planning for the complex landscape we live in globally.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @EMobilityInside
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider


América Móvil and Telcel go Big with Small Cell Systems from SpiderCloud

April 7, 2015

Following a successful launch in June 2014, Telcel and América Móvil was kind enough to let us share the news at Informa’s LTE LatAm event taking place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil this week — where SpiderCloud’s own Amit Jain is speaking.

This is a significant announcement for SpiderCloud and our business partners. And, unlike Ericsson – is not a “pilot” in a single building (“Ericsson Radio Dot installed at commercial building…”).

Small Cell systems have already been deployed and “turned on” for dozens of enterprise customers, with hundreds more planned. Gerardo Aguirre, director of network engineering with Telcel places the importance of this commercial rollout into context:

Our largest customers in Mexico demand and expect a superior mobile network experience at all times. With SpiderCloud as our go-to in-building network solution, Mexico’s business, education and government customers are experiencing the leading edge of in-building mobility as part of our continued commitment to deliver a superior mobile experience.”

Together with our business partners in the region (Cisco, NEC and one more major player), we will work with Telcel and América Móvil to bring in-building services to major metropolitan areas in South America.

SpiderCloud is fast becoming the recognized leader for scalable small cell systems. According to Infonetics (March 2015),SpiderCloud leads the enterprise small cell market as a result of an early focus on the medium-to-large enterprise segment, followed by Alcatel-Lucent.”

SpiderCloud’s system has been deployed by leading operators such as: América Móvil, Verizon, Vodafone UK, Netherlands, EE in United Kingdom (Cisco), Telcel in Mexico, Avea in Turkey (NEC), Warid Telecom in Pakistan, and several more undisclosed operators.

Why SpiderCloud?  We continue to innovate, and the dual-band 3G/LTE and LTE/LTE system with 200 Sectors is the industry’s most flexible and scalable small cell system. Last month we announced the additions of Beacons, Carrier Aggregation use of flexible spectrum bandwidth, and support for Multiple Operators – all part of the same easy-to-deploy over Cat/5/6 Ethernet system (see news) The innovations will help drive down the carrier’s total cost of ownership for large, scalable, indoor small cell deployments.

Another significant move, announced in Barcelona at MWC’15, was Cisco’s news that the #1 enterprise systems provider will resell SpiderCloud’s portfolio (USC 8000 Series). We also developed a radio “snap on” attachment for Cisco’s existing Aironet 3600/3700 Wi-Fi access points (the most popular enterprise Wi-Fi in the world), thus integrating radio access with existing Wi-Fi infrastructure – giving Cisco the ability to target all of its existing Wi-Fi deployments with a simple 3G/4G radio upgrade, thus driving more customer adoption for mobile operators worldwide.

SpiderCloud’s technology is the only small cell system that’s successfully competing, innovating and winning against Ericsson and Huawei for large-scale in-building coverage and capacity solutions — sold to mobile operators. With our partners, it’s now pedal to the metal. Catch up if you can, or give us a call to partner.

Ronny Haraldsvik
SVP/CMO
SpiderCloud Wireless
Twitter: @haraldsvik


“…Just Another Brick In the Wall”?

December 12, 2014

I first heard this song in early December ’79, just after its release, now 35 years ago. We have all rebelled against something or someone at one part in our lives. “We don’t need no thought control” and “Hey! teacher! leave us kids alone!” — Pink Floyd’s music was relevant back then, and it’s relevant now. Roger Waters’s song (Education, Part II) is a protest song against rigid schooling in general and boarding schools.

Behind the brick wall, when you look beyond the one-page “Wall Mounting Kit” for easy to install radio heads (Huawei or Ericsson) you will find the undisclosed pages 2 through 99, and a long list of items needed to make radio heads (DAS) work.

Beyond the simple radio head, you’ll find dedicated cables (CPRI or Cat7a) that are connected to Indoor Radio Units (IRU), which then connects to dedicated Digital Units (DU) with maximum 12 sectors (IRU) per DU for each access technology (LTE or 3G). Each IRU connects to a DU via Fiber and the DU then connects back to the Ericsson RNC (for 3G), or the LTE EPC. Keep in mind that CPRI or Cat7a is not basic Ethernet. Nor can Radio DOT be deployed using existing Ethernet (via VLAN). It takes special handling and expertise to handle Fiber or Cat 7a cables. If you are deploying Radio Dot, Cat7a is not exactly a commonly used cable inside the Enterprise, and can cost 3-4x more per cable than Cat 5/6.

When you are maintaining or deploying DAS, your list of equipment is quite long. A plan could include over 30 different components, special cables and modules.

  • Coax, connectors, splitters or special cabling (Cat7a) which requires special handling
  • Cross band couplers, optical interfaces, boosters, housing panels, etc.
  • Master unit for optical Tx/Rx
  • Power supply and low power ‘Point of Interface’ or you may need Active DAS Tray Point of Interface
  • Male and Female connectors
  • Omni antennas, directional, MIMO or SIS0 directional
  • Coax cables and support for various type of mounts (roof, ceiling, basement, etc.), weatherproofing, sealant, etc.
  • Fiber Extenders
  • Sub-rack for the DC Remote PSU Modules
  • Tri-plexer for each access method
  • Accessory kits and stacking kits, etc.
  • AC/DC Converters for 66W or 100W
  • Fan Modules
  • And then there are the attenuators… and so on – It’s a long list

Cabling the Bricks in the Wall

On the outside, a CPRI or Cat7a cable may look similar to Cat-5/6 Ethernet, but make no mistake, it’s not. It takes a specialist to handle this, and enterprise people know this. IT people cringe when special cables are involved. Why?

Certain cables cannot be bent, crushed or “stressed”. Every cable has values for minimum bend radius and maximum “tensile loading”. (Yes – look it up if you need a good night’s sleep). Some special cables cannot hang freely for long distances or press against edges in an installation. Example: When pulling cable in conduit, all transition points must be kept smooth. In short, every cable must be treated like a baby!

As for the installation, this is where it becomes “fun.” Conduit runs are limited to 100 feet! And, you cannot have more than two 90-degree bends between pull points or boxes! Even working at night, conducting core drilling between floors for conduits with jam-packed risers in-building is also a logistics nightmare. Yes, you heard me. Electronic Industries Association/Telecommunications Industry Association 569, which is the Commercial Building Standard for Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces, even provides more granular details, if you care to find out.

And then there are building codes for optical-fiber cables, keeping in mind maximum recommended distance between main and intermediate cross-connects (4920 feet), and intermediate and horizontal cross-connects recommendations. Single-mode fiber has other regulations. In some cases, telecoms equipment is connected directly to an intermediate or main cross-connect, where connecting cables can be no longer than 98 feet.

We could go on and on. The point is, CPRI is not Ethernet. It’s not simple Cat5/6 Ethernet pull. You need experts. See a good installation checklist overview here.

“Designed by R&D for use in Labs”

If you are contemplating Ericsson’s Radio Dot, keep in mind that you will need lots of Radio Dots and special Cat7a cabling to each of the Dots to power the 100mw radio heads. To “home run” each radio Dot over Cat 7 to/from the Indoor Remote Unit (IRU) means big install cost and several racks of equipment in the data center (Enterprise), considering you can only power 8 Radio Dots per IRU (LTE or 3G) and up to 12 IRU per DU. Each 14-unit rack powers a maximum of 96 Cat7a connected 100mw Radio Heads (or 48 LTE and 48 3G 100mw radio heads). Radio Heads by access technology: If you need 3G and LTE, then you need 2 Radio Heads (one each) which means double the amount of Cat7a cable pull. In brief, 3G+LTE means two full racks (14U each) of equipment if you require maximum reach with 96 100mw radio heads for 3G and LTE coverage. Of course, you will need special installation teams since this is a complicated installation.  Each rack (14u each) limits a 3G + LTE DAS coverage (48 3G + 48 100mw radios) to a maximum 250 to 300,000 square feet. A dual-band deployment would require two full racks, and total 110-120 100mw radios, each with a Cat7a cable pull. So, when you see the Radio Dot, you may think it’s simple.  When you understand what is needed behind the wall to power the Dot, you’ll question the establishment just like Pink Floyd. You’ll soon find out that ideas designed by R&D, for use in labs, may not be suitable in real-life enterprise environments.


Ericsson image of Radio DOT posted on Twitter.
Also see http://www.ericsson.com/thecompany/press/mediakits/radio-dot-system

The IT Friendly Approach

SpiderCloud Wireless has an IT-friendly approach with E-RAN.  The E-RAN system is proven to scale to 100 Radio Nodes (sectors), all powered over Ethernet LAN (or VLAN) with one Services Node, which provides one secure connection to the mobile core. First to market with a dual-mode 3G/4G system, the SCRN-310 Dual-band Radio Node has been in commercial networks since June 2014. It’s the first small cell, as part of a larger system, that’s capable of connecting 32 active users via the 3G band, while at the same time connecting 32 active users (128 RRC) via the LTE band (on one integrated SoC). The same Radio Node can now be software upgraded to switch the 3G band to 4G, making it capable of dual-band 4G+4G (150 Mbps), connecting 64 active users via the same Radio Node.

A dual-band 3G+4G deployment using SpiderCloud would only require one Services Node (1 unit in a rack) and require 25-30 SCRN-310 Radio Nodes (250 mw). The cost advantage for equipment and installation (as compared to Ericsson or Huawei) vs. DAS (radio heads) is 4-5x!

The Radio Node has a pedestal base that slides into a long bracket for ceiling or wall mounting. SpiderCloud Wireless pre-bolts the pedestal base onto the extrusion plate on the Radio Node.

Radio Nodes can be mounted on a wide number of surfaces including the following typical surfaces:

  • • Light grill: Use bolts, nuts and washers to secure the mount bracket using holes in the light grill. Adjust the mounting bracket until the bracket and light grill holes align.
  • • Mount directly on the wall or ceiling: Use drywall screws to secure the mount bracket directly to sheetrock or plasterboard on the wall or ceiling.

Installing a small cell should be as easy as installing a basic enterprise Wi-Fi AP, such as using a T-rail ceiling rail to avoid drilling holes in ceiling tiles.

The Radio Node is fully compliant with the IEEE 802.3at Power Over Ethernet (PoE+) specification. Per IEEE 802.3at, use standard Cat 5e, or better, twisted-pair cable with a maximum length restriction of 100 meters (328 feet) for PoE+.

Power is distributed over two pairs of the four available pairs in Cat 5e or better cables. The Radio Node can accept power on either used, or un-used pairs.

Usage of Ethernet LAN Deployment

By usage of standard enterprise Ethernet and a Radio Node installation process that is familiar with the very large pool of Wi-Fi trained installation companies, the cost of physical installation is significantly reduced as compared to telecommunications technologies that require specialized labor.

The optimal installations share the existing enterprise transport infrastructure to enable faster installation, and reduce capital construction costs for materials.

See the 60-second installation video: http://youtu.be/Q8V070ggyuA

SpiderCloud’s Self Organizing Network (SON) capability configures and optimizes the small cell network to provide a high-performance mobile broadband coverage with very little user intervention. SON is a core product feature that dramatically reduces installation time, fine-tunes the network for high performance, and periodically optimizes the environment to maintain effective network operation. Without this feature, an installer would have to setup the network manually, requiring many weeks (depending on the network complexity) to create an optimal working configuration. However, as a result of this unique feature, the system is auto configured in less than an hour, thereby automating a fairly complex configuration and dramatically reducing the time-to-install.

See the 60-second installation video: http://youtu.be/Q8V070ggyuA

Besides reducing time-to-install, the feature ensures optimal RF coverage and handoff within the SpiderCloud network, and with macro and inter-RAT networks. During network operation, this feature continually monitors the RF environment, makes adjustments to the radio transmit power to adapt to any changes in the RF conditions, and maintains optimal network access.

No More “thought control”

So, if you agree, “We don’t need no thought control” and you’d want an IT-friendly approach to fixing in-building coverage and capacity, easy as Wi-Fi, — then you too can protest against rigid cabling and installation procedures. You have a choice. If you plan to install something in an Enterprise, look to the companies which know and understand enterprise IT requirements.

The E-RAN 3G system is already commercially proven for three years. Other SpiderCloud Wireless customers include Vodafone UK, Vodafone Netherlands, and now also Verizon Wireless, plus leading mobile operators across several continents.

Ronny Haraldsvik
SVP/CMO

Twitter: haraldsvik
spidercloud_inc

Don’t forget to sign up for the December 18th Intel-SpiderCloud Webinar: “In-Building Small Cell Services Opportunities for Enterprise IT and Mobile Operators” – hosted by HeavyReading.

 

 

 

 

 


Small Cell “Super Bass-O-Matic’76”?

October 7, 2014

“Alrighty then,” you say.  Already you’re wondering where this will take us?  In keeping with the 70s theme from our last blog (An Abba tune from ’77 “Take a chance on me” – DAS Dot One Year Later), in this blog we take a look under the hood of another Ericsson “way ahead” announcement, the RBS 6402 (Radio BS).

Much like the famous Super Bass-O-Matic ’76 from SNL, the Radio BS promises to deliver many things. Yes, “the days of troublesome scaling, cutting and gutting are over, because Super Bass-o-Matic ’76 is the tool that lets you use existing radios and technologies” with no “waste, and without scaling, cutting or gutting“. Yes, it’s that simple!”

The RBS 6402 is a high-performance indoor multi-standard/mixed-mode – LTE, WCDMA and Wi-Fi – small cell with carrier aggregation that delivers 300 Mbps LTE.”

Now, disregard PR, Web site marketing, and PowerPoint and let’s look at some of the claims and consider the realities of manufacturing and deploying small cells over enterprise Ethernet:

Radio BS Claims:

  • 3G + Dual LTE + Wi-Fi
  • With 2 x 250 mw transmit power, R-BS 6402 claims it will cover 5,000 sq. m. (or > 50,000 sq. ft.) powered over Ethernet
  • Carrier aggregation (2 x 20 MHz) and supports for 10 bands

Facts & Realities:

  • PoE+ has a power limit of 25.5 W. Average amount available at the access point is ~23 W
  • On average, running 4 PAs at 250 mw, requires ~10W of power (typical power efficiency of a RF front end is ~10%). This leaves just 13 W for running the baseband and everything else.
  • The R-BS supports 10 bands: So, you would think from the PR that the small cell is a multi-operator small cell that supports 10 simultaneous bands. This is simply wrong.
  • Ericsson has to use one of their macro-cell DSPs if they want to run their existing PHY software, plus an additional processor for higher-layer eNB software.
  • The R-BS marketing makes it look like the product can do 3G _AND_ 2 carriers of LTE. But, doing so requires three RF front-ends, something that even Ericsson is not claiming to do. So, the best-case scenario is that the R-BS 6402 can operate as 3G + LTE, or dual-carrier LTE. We know because of our SpiderCloud SCRN-310. The award-winning dual-band Radio Node was announced October 2013 and it shipped commercially (and installed) in operators’ networks in June 2014. One caveat, we use Broadcom’s industry-leading single System-on-a-Chip (SoC) with our own software on top. See more about the build-up of the RN310 and our KPIs.

Questions customers should be asking:

  • What else does an operator need to purchase to use the RBS 6402?
  • How does the small cell connect to the core? There is no mention of any HeNB gateway. Direct connect to EPC via a security gateway of sorts? (Ericsson does not support iuh).
  • Is Ericsson going to build a new HeNB GW (LTE femto gateway)? Or will they directly connect all these small cells to the EPC? What is the end-to-end architecture? When will the missing pieces show up?
  • Is Wi-Fi a module? Are they using the outdoor BelAir portfolio indoors? Any dual-band Wi-Fi module needs 10-12W of power. Where is that coming from? Perhaps a second Ethernet cable pull and a DC power is required?
  • Does the 6402 really offer simultaneous operation in 1 carrier of UMTS, 2 carriers of LTE with carrier aggregation and 2 bands (2.4/5.8) of Wi-Fi? In other words, simultaneous transmission in 5 frequency bands, as PR suggests?
  • If the answer is yes, then note that the PoE+ standard (IEEE 802.3 at) specifies a maximum draw of 25.5 W? An Ericsson Wi-Fi AP alone consumes ~12W of power…”just saying.”
  • When working within the PoE+ budget, can the R-BS even do two carriers of LTE, with each band operating at 2 x 250 mw?  Or will it be only one carrier of LTE when PoE+ is being used?
  • How many simultaneous bands does the R-BS actually support when operational?
  • Can the 6402 really cover 5,000 sq. m. (~55,000 sq. ft.) in an average enterprise with cubicles, private offices, conference rooms, walls, obstructions, elevators etc.?  Or, is 5,000 sq. m. a number based on some kind of ideal environment (which is rarely, never the case when deploying)?
  • How is this small cell synchronized with the macro network? No mention of GPS or any other synchronization technique?
  • When will the new R-BS 6402 be FCC certified (for sale in the USA. No submissions yet)? And, while you’re at it, ask ‘when’ the DOT and related products will be FCC certified (for sale in the USA) too…

You see, it’s tough to squeeze 3G+Wi-Fi+LTE within 8-10W with the current Radio BS approach. It may happen one day or sometime late 2016? Whaaaat?  You mean, yet another announcement where the commercial product is not available for 15-18 months?

All puns aside, Ericsson’s RBS 6402 looks like an indoor small cells capable of doing 2 carrier of LTE OR 1 carrier of 3G and 1 carrier of LTE.

In that sense, it is mimicking SpiderCloud’s SCRN-310. So, since our 310 Radio Node has been shipping since June 2014, we find it odd that Ericsson claims a “first” with the Radio BS. Much like the DOT (See new SpiderCloud-vs-DOT video), this may be another delay-the-market tactic. For now, lots of hot air and more Radio BS?

So, if the Super Bass-O-Matic sounds cool to you, then you’re in for “quite a rush. You’ll never have to scale, cut or gut again!”

Ronny Haraldsvik, SVP/CMO (@haraldsvik)

– Amit Jain, VP of Product Management

Twitter: @SpiderCloud_Inc


“And Then There Were Three”…

March 7, 2014

(Aka, “One got fuddled, and then there were three”). SpiderCloud’s MWC’14 Recap and Commentary

The Genesis album from ’78 is a classic. The title is from an old children’s rhyme (10 little Indians). From our perspective, in the market segments that we play, “and then there were three” summarizes Small Cells at Mobile World Congress.

Before we go on, we have to congratulate GSMA for another banner event in Barcelona. This year there was a record attendance of 85,000 (last year 72,000 attended). The big difference this year was the notable presence of computing companies such as IBM, HP, Oracle, EMC and VMWare. The lines between mobile and enterprise networks are blurring (see blog). The big themes this year focused on wearable technologies, LTE, NFV/SDN, Big Data (analytics) and Small Cells.  GSMA’s Michael O’Hara and his team did a great job, as did Justin Springham and his Mobile World Daily & Live TV teams. See the “Show Wrap Up” and video recaps here.

Small Cells Moving from Hype to Reality

One analyst summarized as follows: “The indoor, enterprise space has notoriously been one where it was hard for operators to add value beyond providing bundles of voice minutes and devices. That is all changing and, as in-building coverage and capacity requirements become urgent, carriers see the chance for new business. That meant there was very heavy emphasis on indoor wireless at MWC, with vendors from all segments – Wi-Fi, small cells, DAS and macrocells – converging on the chief area of growth in usage and revenue.”

The sentiment is very accurate. Where’s there’s smoke, there’s fire. The in-building market is heating up and the DAS and Wi-Fi vendors want a seat at the table which is why we saw many DAS and Wi-Fi “We are Small Cell” related press releases before and during MWC. This is all good.

As for deployments of in-building systems that can scale from hundreds to thousands of employees, the sentiment now is “…and then there were three.”

SpiderCloud Wireless, Huawei and Ericsson are now recognized as the three vendors who have (or will have) systems that can scale to address medium to large enterprise in-building mobile coverage and capacity needs for mobile operator customers.

  1. Huawei has a solution they call Lampsite that deploys like a DAS system, for coverage and capacity inside very large buildings. First deployment includes it’s own HQ in the greater London area.
  2. Ericsson is coming to market with its DAS Dot macro cellular system for single-band 3G or 4G coverage (only) using dedicated CIPRI over Cat 5/6 cabling system in 2015. Ericsson’s CTO on Small Cells, Cloud and more (video).
  3. SpiderCloud has been commercial for over 2 years and is proven with large-scale small cell deployments using existing enterprise Ethernet/VLAN.  In addition, the system includes a platform to enable cloud and applications services. Services beyond basic coverage and capacity were showcased by Vodafone, Intel, NEC, IBM, Seguna and Tango Networks during this year’s MWC. See SpiderCloud RCR interview and Mobile World Live TV panel with Alcatel-Lucent and AT&T.

Beyond Coverage and Capacity, it’s all about services

We enjoyed a lot of interest in our platform’s x86 services module. SpiderCloud’s Services Node (SCSN) provides a trusted connection to the Radio Nodes and a logical view into all devices on the E-RAN, to enable secure services to any mobile device on the network. The SCSN enables mobile operator managed cloud and application services, such as MDM, BYOD, caching, analytics, location and context-aware, security and IP-PBX services. The SCSN services module includes a 64-bit Intel Xeon processor that uses Intel Quick Assist Technology and a 120GB solid-state HDD, offering a virtualized environment for a wide range of applications.  Services examples and demonstrations at MWC included:

  • Intel/McAfee Virtualized Network Security Platform (NSP) to identify and prevent network security threats at the edge of the mobile network, before such threats can reach the core network, by blocking malicious packets sent by a mobile device. NSP protects a device from malicious packets sent by a server on the Internet.
  • Saguna Networks’ demonstrated the benefits of backhaul savings and user experience benefits of a centralized content cache on the SCSN as part of a scalable small cell system for large campus, venues and shopping malls.
  • Ineoquest showed Quality of Experience (QoE) demonstration of mobile video performance by using probes on the small cell network using the SCSN.
  • IBM location and detection virtual machine hosted on the SCSN showed handset-to-location video and advertising “push” services for use at venues and shopping malls. The OTA demonstration included SpiderCloud’s UMTS Radio Node.
  • Tango Networks’ demonstration used the SCSN and Radio Node to show how mobile operators can extend enterprise UC, PBX and mobile call recording services to their entire network, inside and outside the enterprise LAN using any mobile phone via Tango’s Virtualized Accelerator on the SCSN, based on policies configured on the virtual machine on the SCSN.

Small Cells, “there’s an APP for that” (article quote)

Making Deployments easier with EASY-30. Just before MWC, we launched a ground-breaking initiative to help mobile operators and enterprise customers identify, verify and deploy a scalable in-building small cell system in 30 days or less.  The EASY-30 smartphone application enables sales teams to swiftly identify customer requirements for in-building small cell systems and fulfill verification and approval between the operator and its enterprise customer.  The system can then be rapidly deployed over Ethernet and automatically configured via Self Organizing Networks (SON), all within 30 days of the first conversation between operator and enterprise.

Finally, “…one got fuddled”

Cisco is focusing its small cell efforts on the “pub market” (coverage/capacity for 50 subscribers or less) with its small business and residential system portfolio. Time and investments will tell if they’ll put technology efforts into going after the medium and large enterprise market.

Growing Interest in the Enterprise Small Cell Market

“For all the noise from these new product introductions, we would note that privately held SpiderCloud offers a sophisticated indoor coverage system, which it has already been deploying commercially for almost two years. SpiderCloud’s system effectively with its own controller and using SON (self-optimizing network) technology for network optimization, appears to have a solution that has lower up-front costs and is faster to deploy than most DAS system and has been being commercially deployed with partner Vodafone for almost two years.” Needham Co.

SpiderCloud is a key player in the small cell space – even hosting them on one of our tech talks last year. The company continues to grow quickly, deploying their solution in the UK (and elsewhere) as part of Vodafone’s densification/in-building coverage effort.  After discussions with management, we believe the year is setting up nicely for the company, and with multiple operators trialing or deploying their solution and work being done on a multi-operator solution, we believe the future remains bright.” Deutsche Bank, “Signals to Noise”, March 2, 2014

If you’d like to read more about MWC, we recommend:

Ronny Haraldsvik SVP/CMO
Twitter: haraldsvik