Enterprise RAN, So Easy a Caveman Can Do It

June 20, 2016

futurenetworkDid we get your attention?

We conclude our series with two major points:

  • As an industry, we must re-open the discussion on how indoor cellular is built by embracing the technologies that enterprises operate today.
  • Enterprises don’t want to acquire solutions that require construction of a parallel network. If we, as an industry, want to move to an enterprise funded model, winning solutions will cater to an enterprise-telecom network convergence.

To summarize our series on how we see indoor cellular being built, optimization can be achieved by leveraging every possible existing enterprise investment, with the high points as follows:

Physical Layer

  • Use the enterprise’s standards of Category 5e or better cable plant, patch panels and jumper cables to connect radios.

Telecommunications Room

  • Request from enterprise IT PoE+ VLAN on Ethernet switches.

Telecommunications Room Interconnection

  • By using an enterprise VLAN, nothing is required here.

Equipment Room

  • Use as little rackspace, power and HVAC resources as possible.

Backhaul

  • Shared IP backhaul may be a great method to manage ongoing Opex.

In conclusion, the benefits of small cells that integrate into the existing enterprise technology landscape include reduction in Capex and Opex and a faster time-to-service. They satisfy the voracious needs of today’s mobile employees in the enterprise while respecting the business imperatives of both enterprise IT and mobile operator communities.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary

Enterprise Deployment – On Offer, Free Backhaul (Well, Almost)!

June 7, 2016

In the prior installment of this series, we discussed the potential cost and logistics of the Equipment Room as part of improving cellular signal indoors. This post covers the final link in the chain to the mobile core, the backhaul. FYI, if you
are new to this series and want to get the most out of it, please start here, and read the posts in sequence.

FreeBackhual-GRAPHIC-BLOGSetting the Stage
According to one of our Tier-1 operators, Backhaul is the number two largest item behind Labor in their Opex budget. It is a cost that is actively managed and any creative approaches to reducing it, while not risking the Quality of Experience of their subscribers, matters.

With that thinking in mind, let’s dive in.

The traditional approach to networking indoor cellular systems to the mobile core, be it legacy technology (like an eNodeB or Picocell) or Enterprise Radio Access Network “E-RAN” use leased private network facilities.

Private Networks can be:

  • Dark fiber (mucho cost)
  • Metro Ethernet (urban cores)
  • Private IP-VPN (wider availability, MPLS technology)

A common characteristic of these transport networks is that they are highly deterministic and can be tightly controlled to insure optimal performance on the data path. As you probably know, LTE is very much an “end-to-end” architecture where IP packets from each traffic flow (e.g. common data, signaling, VoLTE) possess different priority markers. When a network is congested, these markers enable transport networks to prioritize time bounded flows, like VoLTE, over best effort flows, like common data.

You said “Free Backhaul.” How?

Well, it’s not free, but almost, because it’s using a service that is already in place. In the spirit of completely re-thinking existing approaches to delivering cellular, we suggest using a game changer like Internet for E-RAN backhaul.

In situations where the enterprise Internet link has excess capacity available and can serve as the path to the mobile core from the E-RAN, Internet is viable. This is very much the case in large enterprises and universities where 10Gbps Internet ports are commonly deployed and the actual consumption is less than the available port capacity. This excess capacity can now be used to carry traffic from LTE devices, at no additional cost to the enterprise or the operator.

Believe it or not, Internet based backhaul can actually be better than more expensive private IP backhaul. Why? Most subscribers judge the quality of LTE services based on the speeds they get. If an operator connects an E-RAN system to a 100 Mbps private circuit, then the maximum data rate that a subscriber will ever experience will be 100 Mbps. However, if an operator uses the enterprise’s 500 Mbps Internet Connection, then suddenly the peak rate that a subscriber experiences could go as high as 300 Mbps (on a dual-LTE system with Carrier Aggregation)

The other benefit of Internet is time-to-market. Operators invest a sizable chunk of money in building an indoor cellular system. Using enterprise Internet allows them to turn on these systems sooner and start getting a return on their investment – whether through acquiring new subscribers or offloading the macro network. And if, after three months, they are not happy with the enterprise Internet backhaul, they can always bring their own private IP backhaul.

Note that the operator is not compromising security by using Internet because of end-to-end encryption… from Services Node to the Security Gateway on the border of the core network.

And, of course, with Internet there is minor risk to the indoor subscribers due to occasional Internet last mile congestion. But, for most situations, a big enough last mile link will not congest to a point where lack of QoS controls would create visible problems.

It is also useful to consider that Internet connection sharing will have little net impact on the last mile (the link from Enterprise site to nearest supporting Internet POP). For enterprises that are off-loading their Wi-Fi network by moving mobiles to LTE, the Internet last mile usage remains unchanged because it’s the same traffic to/from Internet.

Finally, when future buying paths are considered, converging all IP traffic onto Internet path can improve the business case whether it’s for the mobile operator or enterprise IT.

Two examples to illustrate this:

  • Operator is providing E-RAN as a managed service. Shared IP connection to core network over Internet can eliminate private network Op-Ex costs and greatly improve the business case for investment.
  • Enterprise is buying E-RAN. Shared IP connection to core network over Internet eliminates private IP Op-Ex. If Internet upgrade is required, buyer gets far more Mbps/$ when buying Internet.

To recap, E-RAN is “enterprise IT friendly” by using:

  • Any available type of IP transport to the mobile core.
  • Seamless upgrade capability if operator or enterprise desires move from Internet to private IP.

In the next installment, we will summarize the end-to-end benefits of E-RAN to satisfy the voracious needs of today’s mobile employees in the enterprise.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary

 


Enterprise Deployment – Space in your Equipment Room – Priceless!

May 16, 2016

sn_vs_fullIn the prior installment of this series, we discussed the potential cost and logistics of adding fiberoptic capacity between all the Telecommunication Rooms and the Equipment Room as part of improving cellular signal indoors. This post covers the infrastructure needs of rack space, power and HVAC in the building’s Equipment Room. FYI, if you are new to this series and want to get the most out of it, please start here, and read the posts in sequence.

Equipment Room

The Equipment Room houses the common equipment that drives the systems installed in each of the Telecommunication Rooms in the building. An Equipment Room can either be standalone, or an identified space in an enterprise data center.

Equipment Room Design Elements:

  • All fiberoptic and, possibly, copper network connections terminate here.
  • Space for necessary racks of enterprise and carrier equipment.
  • Network termination equipment for telecommunication circuits external to the building fed from the building’s Entrance Room.
  • HVAC capacity to maintain correct operating temperature and humidity for the critical equipment that is housed in the room.
  • Power capacity (AC/DC) necessary for the critical equipment that is housed in the room. This can be on UPS and/or Backup Generator.

For reference: Equipment Room, cable pathways and other structural design elements are well documented in the EIA/TIA-569B specification.

Space required in Equipment Room for In-building Cellular

We recently talked to a company that designed a Distributed Antenna System (DAS) for a large 485,000 sq. ft. hospital. According to this company, the DAS system required eight 19” wide, and 72” tall racks of equipment in Equipment room.

  • 8 Racks, occupying more almost 40 sq. ft. of space
    • (4) 72” high, 19” wide, racks for the DAS headend
    • (4) 72” high, 19” wide, racks for the BTS equipment (two bands of LTE, with three sectors of capacity per band)
  • Two 100A circuits from two different power distribution sources

If you have so much space to commit to in-building cellular, you are either lucky, or have tremendous foresight! When the same hospital, looked at SpiderCloud E-RAN, they were surprised to find how little space was required for SpiderCloud:

  • 1U (1U = 1.75” of height) of space inside a 19” rack, for the Services Node
  • Two 15A circuits from two different Power Distribution sources
  • No additional cooling (since the Services Node uses less than 150W of power!)

All commercial floor space has a price, but space in your Equipment Room… that is priceless! The Equipment Room is where all your network connections, from inside the building and outside are coming in. Do you really want to fill it up with racks of equipment to offer a few sectors of LTE capacity to building occupants, when all you really need is 1RU of space to run a network that can deliver ten times as much capacity?

To recap, E-RAN is “enterprise IT friendly” by using:

  • Using 1U of rackspace Equipment Room
  • Dissipates less than 150W of heat
  • Two 15A 110VAC circuits

In the next installment, we will summarize the end-to-end benefits of E-RAN to satisfy the voracious needs of today’s mobile employees in the enterprise.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary

Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection

April 25, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 11.32.59 AMIn the prior installment of this series, we discussed the potential cost and logistics of requiring resources (rack space, power, HVAC) from the enterprise as part of improving cellular signal indoors. FYI, if you are new to this series and want to get the most out of it, please start here, and read the posts in sequence.

This post covers the infrastructure that interconnects the Telecommunications Rooms to the building’s Equipment Room. First, let’s set some context on how Telecommunications Rooms relate to the overall building. Every floor has at least one Telecommunications Room that supports all the needs of that floor. Each of the Telecommunications Rooms are directly connected to the Equipment Room.

Telecommunications Room Design Elements:

  • A Telecommunications Room supports a wiring zone where every location that a physical network cable is installed is no more than 100 meters from the room.
  • Located in the core of building.
  • Stacked on top of each other. This is so cabling can be easily run vertically through the building from the lowest floor to the top.
  • The fiberoptic cabling that is terminated in a floor’s Telecommunications Room is an unbroken run from the Equipment Room.

The fiberoptic cabling between the floors is a major construction project to get into place. It’s elements are:

  • Permits and civil engineering. The cost and complexity varies by municipality.
  • Core drilling concrete floors for the cable runs. This is a messy, wet, and very loud activity that is so disruptive to business operations that it must be done on weekends or at night. Plan to pay overtime wage rates.
  • Running protective conduits for the cabling with periodic pull boxes. Pull boxes are needed due to handling guidelines for fiberoptic cable and the natural friction encountered inside the conduit. To keep it simple, if you mishandle the cable as it’s pulled in, the fibers will break internally.
  • All conduits need to be fire-blocked, as per local regulations, between floors so smoke or flame have no migration path between floors.
  • Fiberoptic cable must be correctly strain relieved and protected from damage in the Telecommunications Room. Protection within the room is generally afforded by innerduct, which is a non-metallic flexible tubing.
  • Each fiberoptic strand of the bundle contained inside the cable is terminated in a jack that is part of an optical patch panel.
  • Patch cords interconnect from the optical patch lack to the active electronic equipment.

For reference: Telecommunications Room, cable pathways and other structural design elements are well documented in the EIA/TIA-569B specification.

As you can see from the requirements above, it is a significant cost where the lack of fiberoptic capacity or the wrong type of fiber is available in the targeted building. To be very clear, the need for fiberoptic cabling project applies to an Ethernet LAN for E-RAN usage or any of the alternate cellular architectures that require dedicated fiberoptic cabling to network their systems together.

Now, let’s connect all of this to indoor small cell architecture.

When E-RAN is deployed using a VLAN carved out of the existing enterprise network, impacts are:

  • No need for fiberoptic capacity. The enterprise PoE+ switches are already networked together.
  • No construction required between the Equipment Room and the floor’s Telecommunications Rooms.

For alternate indoor architectures that have originated by downsizing outdoor macro-cellular technology, they have separate technology end-to-end from the enterprise that has these impacts:

  • Fiberoptic Consumption
    • 2-4 fibers per floor needed.
  • If customer cannot provide cable plant for cellular use, a construction project cost and schedule delay required to build fiberoptic capacity.

From a financial perspective, we have modeled the costs of building a LAN vs. the enterprise carving out a VLAN to host the E-RAN through a building. For a SpiderCloud E-RAN installation, the construction of a standalone LAN, with it’s fiberoptic capacity, adds an additional 24% to the project.

In following the theme of re-opening the discussion on how indoor cellular should be built, infrastructure that is common to all wireless is key to future enterprise use of small cells. We ask why build a LAN (including all it’s lifetime Capex and Opex) when your enterprise customer has already built the network? Even when the situation is Site Acquisition of a full building, the landlord may already have an Ethernet in place acting as the “digital nervous system” for building operations. This network can also host the small cell network.

To recap, E-RAN is “enterprise IT friendly” by using:

  • ZERO use of fiberoptic cabling between the Telecommunications Rooms and the Equipment Room.
  • Savings of 24% on the project by partnering with the enterprise on VLAN sharing on their infrastructure.

In the next installment, we will delve into facilities needs in the Equipment Room.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary

Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room

April 18, 2016

rackinshape2In the prior installment of this series, we discussed Ethernet networking and horizontal cable plant options to connect installed radios to the Telecommunications Room supporting a single floor of a building. FYI, if you are new to this series and want to get the most out of it, please start here and read the posts in sequence.

This post covers the critical, yet usually overlooked, topic of the Telecommunications Room. The word “overlooked” is used on purpose because uncovering issues associated with it are usually discovered during an installation site survey. These discoveries may have remediation costs that can result in budget deviations, construction delays, and/or potential project cancellation. For reference; Telecommunications Rooms, cable pathways and other structural design elements are well documented in the EIA/TIA-569B specification.

Use this diagram as a reference (source):

wirelessdiagram

Let’s explore the elements of a Telecommunications Room and the ramifications associated with an inability to meet the needs of an installation.

  • Rack Space – Vertical rack space is usually discussed in terms of Rack Units “RU” that are 1.75” high. If the present rack in a Telecommunications Room does not have enough free RU’s to house the equipment required for the installation, an additional rack can be added. If the room does not have enough space for an additional rack, it may need to be physically expanded. This is an expensive project that could result in delay/cancellation of cellular service improvement. See this for additional details on standard 19” computer racks.
  • Rack Clearance – There is equipment that could be only one RU in height, but have special requirements that an incumbent rack may not be able to satisfy.
    For Example:

    • Enterprise has a two post rack and the telecom equipment requires a four post rack due to equipment depth. Equipment is mounted to a rack by a “rack ear” attached to each side. The ears can only take a certain amount of downward stress, and deeper equipment needs the support of the additional two posts in rear of rack. If there are enough RU’s available for an installation and necessary additional physical floor space inside the Room, then the project budget and schedule must accommodate changing the rack.
    • Enterprise has no rear access to the rack as the room is very limited in it’s depth. If the telecom equipment requires rear access, the room has to be physically expanded (move one or more walls outwards). This can be an expensive proposition and, in some cases, impossible due to configuration or adjacent use of floor space around the room.
  • Uninterruptible Power Supply “UPS” – This is a design choice of each mobile operator and there are three options for AC power failure:
    • Utility Power only – design UPS for X hours of uptime under X kilowatts of load. X hours is specified by the operator.
    • Protected Backup – “protected” assumes a generator supplies backup power if Utility power fails. Design UPS for 15-30 minutes of uptime under X kilowatts of load. The uptime needs to be sufficient for the generator to come online after a Utility power failure.
    • No UPS – mobile devices fail to the macro-cellular network in event of power loss that takes down indoor cellular service.

Note that a UPS can either require vertical RU’s of space in a rack or wall mount in the room. Either option requires space and cable route planning.

  • AC Power – Depending on the needs of the additional telecom equipment, additional dedicated circuits from serving AC distribution panel may be required. There can be additional costs if a dedicated circuit must be run from an AC distribution panel that is on a backup generator.
  • Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning “HVAC” – the HVAC systems managing the temperature in the Telecommunications Room must be able to handle the additional BTU load generated by new equipment added for the indoor cellular improvement. It is recommended to supply the combined BTUs generated by the gear to the enterprise IT/facilities people to make sure the HVAC can support the additional load. We use a handy Watt-BTU conversion tool located here.

Now, let’s connect this to indoor small cell architectures.

When E-RAN is deployed using a VLAN carved out of the existing enterprise network, impacts are:

  • No physical RU’s consumed in the rack.
  • Additional HVAC load of 78.5 BTU/hr (23W) per PoE+ attached Radio Node.
  • No additional AC outlets required.

For alternate indoor architectures that have originated by downsizing outdoor macro-cellular technology, they have separate technology end-to-end from the enterprise that has these impacts:

  • RU Consumption.
    • 1-2 RU’s for separate Cable Patch panel.
    • Up to 12 RU’s for IRU/rHUB.
    • Up to 6 RU’s for AC-DC Rectifier.
  • Additional HVAC load of 700+ BTU/hr per IRU.
  • Additional AC outlets as-needed.
  • Potential AC-DC rectifier needed to supply -48 VDC.

In following the theme of re-opening the discussion on how indoor cellular should be built, infrastructure that is common to all wireless is key to future enterprise use of small cells. In the last post we stated that “Enterprises will not want to acquire solutions that require construction of a parallel network.” That statement is even more important when physical resource constraints and the high cost of remediation of limited rack space, AC power and HVAC enter the equation.

To recap, E-RAN is “enterprise IT friendly” by using:

  • Incumbent enterprise cabling and PoE+ Ethernet switches.
  • ZERO footprint in Telecommunications Rooms.
  • Ethernet PoE+ use that is already planned into HVAC load.

In the next installment, we will delve into the Telecom vertical riser that networks the Telecommunications Rooms throughout a given building back to the main room and/or enterprise Data Center.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary

Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer

April 11, 2016

ethernetappleTo begin the discussion on enterprise transport, we’ll start at the bottom with the humble cabling that transports data traffic and work our way up. Please refer to the start of our series here if you have not read it.

In most office settings, Category 5e unshielded twisted pair “UTP” cabling is the dominant physical layer that carries Ethernet connections from Ethernet Switches to attached computers or Wi-Fi Access Points. It has the necessary bandwidth to support a 1Gbps full-duplex Ethernet connection (IEEE 802.3 1000BaseT) while supplying DC power from the Ethernet switch for Power over Ethernet plus (PoE+ IEEE 802.3at) attached devices like the E-RAN’s Radio Nodes.

Category 6a and 7 cable plants are unusual in most enterprises as their costs are much higher (50% and 100% higher, respectively) with no perceived benefits. Why? The majority of computers and access points attach at no more than 1Gbps and, where a 10Gbps attachment is needed, it usually is an optical connection choice due to copper transport constraints that limit distances.

Now, let’s connect this to indoor small cell architectures. For those who are not familiar with the E-RAN architecture, please refer to this short video before proceeding forward.

The E-RAN has a C-RAN split that implements, via a SoC, Layer 1 & 2 in the Radio Nodes (shifting analog processing to the edge of the network), and a standard PoE+ 1Gbps Ethernet for IP/IPSec fronthaul connectivity. This design choice means that the data traffic over the fronthaul network is limited to:

  • Encrypted GTP flows between UE’s and the mobile core.
  • E-RAN housekeeping between the Services and Radio Nodes.

It also allows the E-RAN to use whatever the available data cable plant that the enterprise has available in the site.

For alternate indoor architectures that have originated by downsizing outdoor macro-cellular technology, they require a more expensive Category 6a or 7 shielded twisted pair cable type. The cabling is used as a wideband transmission line to replace coaxial cable or fiberoptic cable between the box in the Telecommunications Room and a radiating element. It’s important to note that this is not Ethernet, and has no relationship with the enterprise infrastructure.

Additionally, if the enterprise and proposed indoor system use different cable plant (enterprise uses Category 5e and indoor system uses Category 6a), it will require the establishment of an additional patch panel in the Telecommunications Room. This is a notable issue due to rack space constraints in most enterprise Telecommunications Rooms as most of them are jam packed with their own enterprise transport infrastructure.

At a high level, this is the comparison:

telecomcloset

In following the theme of re-opening the discussion on how indoor cellular should be built, infrastructure that is common to all wireless is key to future enterprise use of small cells. Enterprises will not want to acquire solutions that require construction of a parallel network.

E-RAN is “enterprise IT friendly” by using:

  • Incumbent cable plant.
  • PoE+ Ethernet for Radio Node power and fronthaul.
  • IP/IPSec for fronthaul. Load is UE traffic plus a 10% overhead for E-RAN housekeeping.

In the next installment, we will delve into the dimensions of Telecommunications Room logistics and constraints.

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary

Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage

March 28, 2016

Up until five years ago, indoor cellular services were improved by constructing a parallel network inside the location that had no relation to the private infrastructure used by the enterprise occupant(s) of that location. While this was good for it’s time, the solution was limited to very large and important buildings due to its cost.

blog0316-1

SpiderCloud’s pioneering Enterprise Radio Access Network “E-RAN” platform emerged five years ago, and demonstrated a new way to build large indoor cellular networks, using small cells connected via existing Ethernet LANs. This was revolutionary.

blog0316-2

But, why was it revolutionary? Because E-RAN was both the first platform to use the well understood “enterprise technology stack” in a mobile RAN application, and shifting analog RF processing to the very edge of the network.

As with most revolutionary technologies, there was hesitation in adopting this new architecture. Once the adoption decision had been made, the system posed transport implementation choices for network engineers that ranged from:

  1. Mobile operator must build dedicated networks and own all network elements.
  2. Mobile operator reuses existing enterprise transport network inside the location.

Our early adopter mobile operators, who have matured their own deployment processes, have gone from owning every element in the beginning to ~75% of the installations reusing the existing enterprise transport now.

blog0316-3

At the same time as we were commercialized, look-alike products to E-RAN appeared on the market, products that claimed to use Ethernet, but were merely using Cat5/6/7 cables. Yet, as long as operators built dedicated LANs for SpiderCloud, these look-alike products seemed to offer the same economics as SpiderCloud.

The purpose of this series is to re-open the discussion on how indoor cellular should be built.

Drivers:

  • 70% of cellular usage is indoors.
  • Demand for mobile data is increasing, revenue is not.
  • Indoor LTE (and 5G) must have a Wi-Fi like economics.
  • Operators can’t keep offloading subscribers to Wi-Fi without risking their long-term value proposition.

But how? That is what this series will explore. We welcome you to sign-up to our blog, follow-us on twitter, and send in your questions and comments.

Here are some of the topics we will discuss:

  • Physical layer – Cabling (copper and fiberoptic)
  • What is Ethernet?
  • Inband and VLAN Sharing
  • Watch that capacity!
  • Managing the Cloud RAN Split
  • Practical Enterprise lessons
  • Enterprise Partnership

– Art King, SpiderCloud Wireless, Director of Enterprise Services & Technologies

Twitter: @ArtKingg
Visit our Enterprise IT site @ http://SpiderCloud.com/EInsider

Other posts from the Enterprise Deployment Series:

  1. Enterprise Deployment – Setting the Stage
  2. Enterprise Deployment – Ethernet and the Physical Layer
  3. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room
  4. Enterprise Deployment – Telecommunications Room Interconnection
  5. Enterprise Deployment – Equipment Room
  6. Enterprise Deployment – Backhaul
  7. Enterprise Deployment – Summary